Memorial to All Victims
Envisioned as a memorial, the structure would commemorate all unnamed  victims of war or violence in the city, specifically those caught up in  conflict they didn’t choose to participate in.

Via

Memorial to All Victims

Envisioned as a memorial, the structure would commemorate all unnamed victims of war or violence in the city, specifically those caught up in conflict they didn’t choose to participate in.

Via


Kira Leigh’s Depression Triggers
Kira Leigh‘s website comes with a warning: “Many pieces deal directly with the symptoms and sisters of depression and are therefore triggering.” While on the surface, Leigh’s work may seem fun and fantastical, it is also highly personal and psychological, addressing subjects of anxiety, body dysmorphia, life obstacles, and feminist issues.

Via

Kira Leigh’s Depression Triggers

Kira Leigh‘s website comes with a warning: “Many pieces deal directly with the symptoms and sisters of depression and are therefore triggering.” While on the surface, Leigh’s work may seem fun and fantastical, it is also highly personal and psychological, addressing subjects of anxiety, body dysmorphia, life obstacles, and feminist issues.

Via

What’s almost certain, though, is that if the unionist parties carry on with this relentless litany of negatives, the vast majority of voters will simply stop listening to them long before the two-and-a-half year referendum campaign is over.

And even if their campaign of fear and negativity is successful in achieving the “no” vote they crave, it will leave Scotland – the day after the referendum – with no prospect of a better future, and no idea at all of how it should move forward.

If the independence debate is to remain alive, therefore, and is not to become a huge turn-off for the vast majority of voters, it’s now absolutely essential that unionist politicians start developing their own positive vision for Scotland’s future in the UK, start advocating it, and fight for its inclusion in the coming referendum as if they cared more for that positive vision than for the momentary pleasure of inflicting a possible yes-no humiliation on Mr Salmond.

Let’s be clear here: when people vote in this referendum, they will be voting for independence or the union (or possibly devo max, although it won’t happen); we will not – I repeat, NOT – voting for our favoured political parties. Therefore, when producers are choosing people to appear on their shows, you would except an even split between the two/three viewpoints. However, for some bizarre reason, it has been decided that each of the three unionist parties deserves to have their own version of the “no” arguments put forward, even though each amounts to the same thing. Conversely, it has been decided that independence = SNP, meaning the “yes” arguments are supported by only one person.

UK Foreign Secretary William Hague’s threat that Scotch whisky would no longer be promoted overseas has backfired after it emerged that the UK Government actually charges Scottish organisations for use of British Embassy facilities.

First Minister Alex Salmond today revealed that the Scottish Development body are charged £3000 every time they hold a reception aimed at promoting the iconic drink.

In contrast, when UK trade and Investment groups hold similar events they are allowed to use the facilities for free.

A strange switch has happened in which the SNP have become thoughtful, pragmatic nationalists as far as you could imagine from ‘Braveheart’ and ‘Trainspotting’ sentiment. Instead, the romantic, fantasyland nationalists are those defending the British state and Westminster world: Gordon Brown, David Cameron and the unionist parties in Scotland.

They are romantic nationalists because they are letting their emotional attachment to the idea of the UK drive how they think of things. They tell themselves and the rest of us a selective, implausible, sanitised version of British history where we only did good things: brought ‘civilisation’ to the Empire, abolished slavery and beat the Nazis, and never address the complexities, nuances and darkside of having been an imperial power.

But the demand amongst Scots for control over our own affairs was strong nonetheless. By 1950 over 2 million - over half the entire electorate - had signed up to the Scottish Covenant, a polite request to Westminster to grant Scotland Home Rule within the Union.  No petition has ever obtained the support of such a large percentage of the population of any part of the UK.  

However when Labour Prime Minister Clement Attlee received the request from the Scottish people for Home Rule within the Union, he rejected it out of hand.  He could do so without any threat to his party’s position.  Labour peer Robert Morrison stated that the matters involved were “much too complicated” to be put to a referendum.  Scotland had to suck it up.  

Home Rule was off the table, and would remain so for 20 years.  It was a painful lesson for Scotland.  You don’t get anywhere with Westminster by being Miss Nice and asking politely.  Westminster only understands threats.

Whilst we’ve been expecting a crushingly negative reaction to Scotland’s 2014 independence referendum, we’ve been gobsmacked by the amount of absolute nonsense being spouted by the British press.  Their hysterical scare stories are too good to be ignored, and we plan on bringing you as many as possible here as 2014 approaches.

Scotland’s story is a “Hollywood invention”, we are often told. It was “wildly romanticised”, or simply “didn’t happen”. Whilst we should ensure our knowledge of the subject is as factual as possible, it is fair to say that Scotland’s obsession with freedom is not a post-Braveheart phenomenon but a very real and long-lasting notion centred at the very heart of our culture.  We wouldn’t dismiss India’s struggle for independence as fictional due to some inaccuracies in the 1982 film Ghandi.  Films do not create these notions; they interpret them.

National Collective is an open collaboration of talent focused on driving social and political change in Scotland through a variety of the arts.

With the most exciting political period for centuries fast approaching Scotland, now is the time for the country’s artists, musicians and writers to help shape the vision of a new society and nation.

US/Nigeria Relations

by Jayne Cortez and the Firespitters

From the Album There it is (1982)

Vote Britain

by Alan Bissett. http://alanbissett.com/

deadpaint:

Zdzislaw Beksinski,  Unkown title

deadpaint:

Zdzislaw Beksinski,  Unkown title

jacobvanloon:

Mechanicsville for Gallery 1988 (LA)
detail
Jacob van Loon

jacobvanloon:

Mechanicsville for Gallery 1988 (LA)

detail

Jacob van Loon

(Source: jacobvanloon)

by Allison Schulnik
via